Return To The Mac

After a long time spent focusing on iOS, I return to more OS X centered paradigm. I spend at least 7 hours every day on a Mac, and I’ve been a part of this iOS craze that is running rampant on the streets of the interwebs. This thought plagued me today, as I was going to work, and than it got reinforced when I was checking out AlphaEfficiency Analytics. Solid 25% of our visitors are coming from Mavericks alone. Technically it means that more than 25% of our visitors are coming from a Mac, and yet lately, everybody has been talking about iOS. Therefore I see an opportunity there, and also a chance to rekindle some Mac love we commonly share out there.

Workflow innovations

My workflows have undergone through the scrutiny of simplification, which has lead some space for me to go through much needed maintenance of my Mac. As of now, most of the apps I use have been backtracked in my mind, and simplified to the bare bone simplicity to accommodate the iOS paradigm. If it ain’t simple, than it is the process that I invest zero time thinking about, as it is completely running in the background of my mind or computer.

Workflow innovations need to go in the direction of writing and creating content. Also the fields that I will investigate more deeply are in the domain of the automation. Investing up front in certain tasks, so I can be laid back and not think about them later. Like organizing the items in the download folder is completely redundant, when I know where I want them based on the file extension itself.

Breaking the “Truck Paradigm”

Lately we often hear that Mac’s (and laptop) are trucks and how computers are on their way out. From what I see, this will hardly be the case in the future. Any professional won’t be able to move over to iPad Only, any time soon, as there are numerous reasons for this, but the key reason is the price/power ratio.

Computers are big therefore incredibly cheap. Their prices are going further down, as they are becoming a commodity, and tablets are still underpowered in terms of performance per dollar. So called trucks are here to stay for a while now. They will dominate the substantial part of our working lives, so we can accept the reality and get used to them. Becoming “mobile lean” is a luxury for people who can afford it, and I am not speaking financially, rather work wise.

Until “mobile lean” becomes your reality, don’t try to force yourself into “mobile only” world, because you will miss out on the productivity that your main working environment gives you. Sheer raw power of your laptop often tends to be forgotten as we play around with new toys.

Let’s be real – Proper device at the proper time

If we take a deep hard look at ourselves and stop joking around, the actual place where do the actual work is still laptop/desktop. You really need to be kidding yourself in thinking that you can actually be more productive by using the mobile apps instead of the full blown desktop ones. As I’ve previously discussed my “move to mobile” there are advantages to mobile approach that are keeping this approach viable, but they aren’t always “worth it”. We have to understand what device is leveraging its strengths and what times.

There are numerous occasions where laptops efficiency will absolutely nullified, because it is not time nor place to take the laptop out and start working. While in those occasions tablet and a smartphone can completely supplicate. Having a laptop out during the meeting feels completely inappropriate, while taking notes on a tablet sounds way more socially acceptable. Also, there are numerous situations where you might bring the tablet, and not even consider bringing on the laptop.

Also when it comes to mobility, we know that we won’t be lugging laptops with us all the time. These are the instances where we have to rely that our mobile devices are our default environment. But at the end of the day, we make compromises between functionality and mobility.

The next steps

After being in iOS bubble for almost 6 months now, I can say how liberating it feels to return to the desktop. All the things that were “out of reach” are now breeze and a simplicity to get done. This increased efficiency comes at a price of increased risk of distraction, which is an area that I am working on right now. However, the trade off is insane, especially when you are keeping tabs on multiple projects at the same time, run a team of designers, have an IM turned on for instant communication with the team members and having Omnifocus help me stay on top of things like a champ.