How to Improve Daily Productivity Process

I’ve always evangelized habits as a cornerstone of extremely powerful productivity systems. I am a big proponent of doing the tasks that need a lot of energy early in the morning, and since I’ve started regularly writing in the morning hours, my output became stellar. But outside of doing the big task first, one more thing emerged as an actionable productivity hack, certain something that would keep me on track with the small tasks that add value when completed daily.

As I am simultaneously running 3-4 projects at the same time, and I am obligated to keep focus on all of them, I’ve decided to create this daily task list inside of Omnifocus, and stick to it. It will be prioritized according to the things that make the most money, and followed through every business day. Building out this list will help me stick to my goals, without needing to remember all the context information. This will ease up the cognitive overload in such a way where I will just get in, complete the tasks, and move on to the next thing.

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These tasks will also have predetermined time reminders, that will occur every day at the same time. This way I will be able to establish a cycle, which once established, will be able to carry me through my daily activities without missing a single important thing. Of course, these things will occur in the morning, so the daily miscellaneous activity will come after lunch.

Even if I don’t get to complete all the pre-planned tasks, I will have the reminders pop-up automatically, as per the plan, and I will easily be able to get back on productive track. Omnifocus reminders have worked pretty well for me, especially when they show up on iPhone, and allow me to commit to the tasks, in the cases where I’ve forgotten

Why creating a daily repetitive task list?

Often we go through the daily task lists, and we don’t even realize that we’ve completed them. Due to the lack of structure, I’ve found myself doing the same task twice. Even though we habitually know the things we need to do every day, the lack of structure easily gets us sidetracked in a sense that, as we have so many small tasks that need to happen daily, we just forget them. The biggest reason why we should create a daily working habits list is probably the sense of accomplishment. The dopamine surge I get from checking off a task as done is giving a lot of purpose to my day. Task management in a sense is a gamification of your own productivity system.

Creating this daily ritual task list is not an easy process, but it does give a healthy dose of structure. You don’t need to plan out a lot, as all of these activities together shouldn’t take up more than a total of 2.5 hours of your time. After a month of completing this task list, I’ll create a task to create a follow up to this article, where I will explain what were the gains.

Have you ever tried creating a daily structured task list? What were your results?